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2016 Ellen Page Daily
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Ellen’s Schedule

  • Events
    Juno Live-read. April 8, 2017.
    Info/Tickets

  • Filming Dates
    Nothing at the moment.

  • Television
    Nothing at the moment.
  • Latest Tweets

    Latest Photo Additions

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    View HQ Gallery /photos

    Projects

    Into the Forest
    Role: Nell
    Status: Completed
    Release: Jun 3, 2016 (CA) / July 22, 2016 (US)
    Tallulah
    Role: Tallulah
    Status: Completed
    Release: July 29, 2016 (Netflix)
    Gaycation S02 (Viceland)
    Role: Host
    Status: Completed
    Release: Sept 7, 2016
    Window Horses
    Role: Kelly (voice)
    Status: Completed
    Release: 2016
    Flatliners
    Role: Courtney
    Status: Completed filming
    Release: Sept 29, 2017
    NEWS  
    The Third Wave
    Role: TBA
    Status: Filming late 2016
    Release: TBA
    NEWS  
    Sylvia Beach Project
    Role: Sylvia Beach
    Status: Pre-Production
    Release: TBA
    NEWS  
    Mercy
    Role: Lucy
    Status: Completed filming
    Release: TBA
    NEWS  
    Lioness
    Role: Leslie Martz
    Status: Pre-Production
    Release: TBA
    NEWS  
    Sally Ride Project
    Role: Sally Ride
    Status: Pre-Production
    Release: TBA
    NEWS  
    Queen & Country
    Role: Tara Chace
    Status: In Development
    Release: TBA

    Official Links

    * = Most recently added quotes.

    [On coming out] “I’m happier than I probably could imagine. Now it doesn’t feel like I was ever not out. It’s hard for me to imagine not existing in the way that I’m existing now. It boggles my mind that it seemed so difficult and so impossible. I wish I’d done it sooner, quite frankly. Some dark cloud has completely evaporated, thank goodness.”

    Source: Variety Exclusive Interview – June 26, 2015.*

    [On her career after coming out] “I was feeling uninspired, and lost the love and joy I felt in making films. I’m gay — of course I want to play gay characters. To have the freedom to pursue that without any anxiety is nice.”

    Source: Variety Exclusive Interview – June 26, 2015.*

    “A huge thing before I was out was the dress on the carpet and the heels. It’s like, ‘This is what you have to do.” There was this pressure to look a certain way and be a kind of femininity, which is not what I identify with. If you see me in a dress I look like an idiot’.”

    Source: Variety Exclusive Interview – June 26, 2015.*

    “I feel extremely fortunate and humble when I have experiences with LGBT people who come up to me and say how I helped them come out. Those moments are really extraordinary. They are typically really emotional. The biggest feeling I get is gratitude. I totally stayed in the closet, and I felt guilty about it. I was finally able to get out, and that was my life journey. I’m interested in gay issues. It’s natural for that to be a part of my life.”

    Source: Variety Exclusive Interview – June 26, 2015.*

    “I used to feel this constant pressure to be more feminine; a quiet or sometimes not-so-quiet demand—’You need to wear a dress or people will think you’re gay… now I feel a sense of freedom in dressing, and I’m enjoying it so much.”

    Source: VOGUE Magazine USA – April, 2015.

    “You just feel different in the world. Once you’ve done something that you used to think was impossible, what could ever really scare you again? Even now, press is more enjoyable because I don’t have to have certain conversations. For instance, I’m never going to have to have a conversation about a dress, or heels, ever again.”

    Source: Out Magazine’s OUT100 – December, 2014.

    “No one’s ever been so direct as to say, ‘You’re gay, so we’re gonna hide it,’ But there’s an unspoken thing going on. [People] believe it’s the right thing to do for your career. They don’t realize it’s eroding your soul. It was eventually about me being like, Wait, why am I listening to that? At what point did I let those things become important?”

    Source: Out Magazine’s OUT100 – December, 2014.

    “We all go through a journey and get where we need to be, but I really did start feeling guilty. I kind of felt like an asshole.”

    Source: Out Magazine’s OUT100 – December, 2014.

    “[Freeheld] is very direct in showing how discrimination against the LGBT community affects people. There’s no getting around the unfairness that happened here, and just how illogical and almost psychopathic it felt. And it’s so exciting to get to do a love story with the sex that you actually fall for. I’m thrilled about it.”

    Source: Out Magazine’s OUT100 – December, 2014.

    “Let being yourself become a trend.”

    Source: Out Magazine’s OUT100 – December, 2014.

    “I was 10 when I started acting. A casting director came to my school looking for kids. I auditioned for a TV movie called Pit Pony, and I got it. Acting became an immediate fixation. I was a child, but I was so ambitious. At 17, I costarred in Hard Candy, about a pedophile and his victim, whom I played. My character had to castrate the pedophile. I’ve always loved learning things for a part, and I remember researching castration and thinking, This is so interesting. I’m a nerd that way: I love the challenges of this job.”

    Source: W Magazine – September 16, 2014.

    “I’ve experienced basically nothing but support after coming out. It’s actually really kind of blown my mind. I thought that there would be a lot more viciousness, but maybe that’s because you’re afraid and for some reason you have this perspective, probably because of your own anxiety. To me, that’s been the most beautiful thing because it’s so indicative of the change and growth that’s happening.”

    Source: Access Hollywood Interview – May 12, 2014.

    “I used to say in photo shoots, ‘I would rather be in boy underwear with my hands on my tits than put that thing on.”

    Source: The Hollywood Reporter Interview – May 7, 2014.

    “Sometimes I think when you’re like, ‘Hey, I don’t give a shit,’ that’s the moment where people don’t give a shit.”

    Source: The Hollywood Reporter Interview – May 7, 2014.

    “I don’t believe in eye-for-an-eye. The most incredible, sustainable, beautiful movements have been non-violent movements of civil disobedience.”

    Source: Cineplex Magazine – May, 2014.

    “As a woman and an actor something I’ve always strived for is to play roles that offer a different perspective of what a young woman can be.”

    Source: Cineplex Magazine – May, 2014.

    “You think you’re in a place where you’re all I’m thrilled to be gay, I have no issues about being gay anymore, I don’t feel shame about being gay, but you actually do. You’re just not fully aware of it. I think I still felt scared about people knowing. I felt awkward around gay people; I felt guilty for not being myself.”

    Source: Flare Magazine Interview – April 29, 2014.

    “You hear things like, ‘People shouldn’t know about your life because you’re creating an illusion on-screen.’ But I don’t see other actresses going to great lengths to hide their heterosexuality. That’s an unfair double standard.”

    Source: Flare Magazine Interview – April 29, 2014.

    “The more time went by, the more something just happened, an ‘Oh my god—I want to love someone freely and walk down the street and hold my girlfriend’s hand.'”

    Source: Flare Magazine Interview – April 29, 2014.

    “What I have learned is that love, the beauty of it, the joy of it and yes, even the pain of it, is the most incredible gift to give and to receive as a human being. And we deserve to experience love fully, equally, without shame and without compromise.”

    Source: HRCF’s Time to Thrive Conference – January 14, 2014.

    “This world would be a whole lot better if we just made an effort to be less horrible to one another.”

    Source: HRCF’s Time to Thrive Conference – January 14, 2014.

    “There are too many kids out there suffering from bullying, rejection, or simply being mistreated because of who they are. Too many dropouts. Too much abuse. Too many homeless. Too many suicides. You can change that and you are changing it.”

    Source: HRCF’s Time to Thrive Conference – January 14, 2014.

    “Hopefully people will continue to evolve and get rid of whatever issue they have with the LGBT community. As a gay person, it’s hard for me to fathom why you would hate me because I am gay, so I hope that the more time goes on, the more people realise that we’re just human beings living our lives and falling in love, which to me is a very beautiful and rare thing, and why would you not want that for someone?”

    Source: HRCF’s Time to Thrive Conference – January 14, 2014.

    “But that’s the gift of the job I get to do, you get to move through so much of your own shit. You can go in to play a character and feel so different from her on a surface level. Next thing you know, it’s moving something inside of you that you didn’t know was there. What a gift that my job is about getting to feel.”

    Source: The Globe and Mail – October 4, 2013.

    “I don’t know why people are so reluctant to say they’re feminists. Maybe some women just don’t care. But how could it be any more obvious that we still live in a patriarchal world when feminism is a bad word? Feminism always gets associated with being a radical movement – good. It should be. A lot of what the radical feminists [in the 1970s] were saying, I don’t disagree with it”

    Source: theguardian.com – July 4, 2013.

    “I know that I was always excited to see, when I was a kid, to see girls and women in movies that offered a different perspective to the sort of very narrow lens of how women are usually portrayed and seen and expected to be. It’s something that I’ve always pushed for for the roles that I’ve wanted to play, or even when I’ve gotten the role, pushed for how I want to dress. It’s absolutely important to me, just because it’s naturally important to me as a person and I don’t know why a woman wouldn’t be a feminist. It doesn’t make sense to me. Or a man, for that matter.”

    Source: Next Movie – May 30, 2013.

    [Porn name formula/first pet and the street you grew up on] “Oh, Fido-Dido Columbus. I had two turtles named Fido and Dido, so I feel we should combine the two.”

    Source: Next Movie – May 30, 2013.

    “I’m a little crazy. When I see dogs, the world stops and I have to pet it and you know, the voice.. It’s not good. The shift makes people uncomfortable, I think.”

    Source: Craig Ferguson Interview – May 28, 2013.

    “I didn’t study it in any formal sense. I think I’ve just been extremely fortunate to work with really great people ever since I was ten years old. I’ve always been drawn to stories and telling them; whether it was through being a part of theater when I was a little kid, or film, or with music, there’s just been an innate desire to feel that connection. But I always feel a little silly when I try to explain it because I make it sound serious and dramatic, which I don’t think it is. It’s actually really playful, even when you’re going to those dark places. It’s a gift, because I get to have a job where I’m free to venture into those realms and I really like to embrace that.”

    Sourcemotherjones.com – September 11, 2010.

    “I’m really interested in permaculture and learning more about it, and in organic gardening, and in Nova Scotia having a sustainable food system. Every time I go to the farmer’s market, I kind of fantasize about growing food more.
    I also have an immense respect for osteopaths. I know I sound crazy! I don’t think I would ever be able to do something like that, but I don’t know.”

    Sourcemotherjones.com – September 11, 2010.

    “I just don’t think I’m special because I’m an actor and I never would. Of course I take what I do seriously because I love doing it, and I love being in films and making films, but I don’t take myself seriously. And I have a lot of gratitude for everything. I have amazing friends and awesome dogs, and I think it’s just about keeping things in perspective. It’s not just about acting for me. I care a lot about a lot of other things because I’m a human being on a planet in a lot of transition right now. And that’s kind of what my focus is on.”

    Sourcemotherjones.com – September 11, 2010.

    “I am a feminist and I am totally pro-choice, but what’s funny is when you say that people assume that you are pro-abortion. I don’t love abortion but I want women to be able to choose and I don’t want white dudes in an office being able to make laws on things like this. I mean what are we going to do – go back to clothes hangers?”

    Source: theguardian.com – April 4, 2010.

    “I’m very interested in psychology. For a while I thought seriously about becoming a therapist for troubled children. Psychology is not too dissimilar to acting, I always think.”

    Source: theguardian.com – April 4, 2010.

    “[Pressure on women to be beautiful] I hate to admit it but, yeah. I definitely feel more of a sense of personal insecurity. I really try and smarten up when I feel that way but sometimes it does get to me. The fact is, young girls are bombarded by advertisements and magazines full of delusional expectations that encourage people to like themselves less and then they want to buy more things. It is really sad and it encourages the consumerist cycle. Boys used to have it slightly easier but I think they are now getting more of the same kind of pressure. Look at all the guys in junior high who think they should have a six-pack.”

    Source: theguardian.com – April 4, 2010.

    “I think that as a girl — woman — it’s already not as easy, in the sense that interesting roles for girls and women tend to be few and far between. That’s just the reality that I think most people would agree with. So that can be frustrating. I just get sent so many things that are like, “So, here’s another story about a guy….” But that’s just what it is. I’m kind of getting more excited about developing my own stuff, or getting involved early in projects and doing my best to make things that I care about happen.”

    Source: Next Movie – March 31, 2010.

    “Drew [Barrymore] started calling me ‘Small Newman’, she’s a big fan of Paul Newman and I guess called me her ‘little Paul Newman’ once which is incredibly humbling and it turned into ‘Small Newman’, so now I’m pretty much called ‘Small’. I love it.”

    Source: Ellen DeGeneres Interview – October 7, 2009.

    “Id rather it than, ‘Largey McLarge’!” (On her nickname ‘Small’.)

    Source: Ellen DeGeneres Interview – October 7, 2009.

    “I’m not a fancy person. I love small spaces. I like tiny cars. I don’t buy things, aside from music and books. I don’t get loads of attention and maybe it’s because I’m kind of boring. I don’t think I’m boring, but I have different interests. I don’t go out much, not because I’m hiding but because I’m not a big drinker. I go out and have a good time, I go to concerts and stuff.”

    Source: USA Today – October 1, 2009.

    “When I was a teenager I became obsessed with Canadian independent films and its all I watched. Such amazing films in this country that I wish got seen more. I give people my little Canadian films list and they like it.”

    Source: DP/30: Whip It, actors Ellen Page, Alia Shawkat – September, 2009.

    “I got back from shooting a movie overseas called Mouth to Mouth I shaved my head, I missed two months of school and I moved to Toronto right after that… like a really crazy time in my life. I made an agreement with my parents ‘yeah, no I’m gonna chill out for a bit, just gonna go be a grade 11 student.. catch up on work.’ I hadn’t even moved into my apartment where I was going to be living. I was staying with my Aunt in Tobico… and the first script I got was Hard Candy and I was like; ‘sorry guys’ and I got that role and that was my first American movie and then it was just that’s kinda what ended up leading to everything really, was Hard Candy.”

    Source: DP/30: Whip It, actors Ellen Page, Alia Shawkat – September, 2009.

    “I’d ice-skated before, because I’m Canadian and that’s what you do as a kid, but I’d never, ever been on quad skates. So I trained for three months with a derby trainer. I actually never got badly injured—I’m tough as frickin’ nails.”

    Source: Marie Claire – September 9, 2009.

    “I loved Jurassic Park and I thought Laura Dern was super cool. It really scared me though and I used to sleep on the top bunk so the dinosaurs couldn’t get to me. But then slowly I realised how big they were, and that in fact I should sleep under the bed, so I think I did that for a little while.”

    Source: NY Times – February 7th, 2008.

    The Breakfast Club really bothered me. This is, like, an iconic movie, and the coolest character, Ally Sheedy, goes from being this interesting quirky girl to being made ‘hot’ so she can make out with frickin’ Emilio Estevez? Give me a break!” (On her frustration with how young women are portrayed in film.)

    Source: People – January 28, 2008.

    [on her perfect day] “Maybe wake up, have some delicious coffee, eat some delicious fruit, then go for a bike ride to a lake and bring a good book. And read and swim and read and swim — just something super simple, I guess. Mellow.”

    Source: hollyscoop.com – February 19, 2008.

    “I hesitate about having aspirations that are too intense, because I just don’t know what’s going to happen. As corny as it sounds, I guess the answer would be remaining as honest as possible and having the control to play roles that are fulfilling and challenging to me and that I feel passionate about. And I hope, in the next five years, that’s going to be something I’ll be able to do consistently.”

    Source: hollyscoop.com – February 19, 2008.

    “People judge you left, right and centre, and you see people judging other people because they are a size four [an eight in the UK] and it is disgusting. They just make you feel like crap and make you go out and buy things to fill that void. They propel the consuming machine.”

    Source: theguardian.com – February 1, 2008.

    “We all have our insecurities. I would like to say, ‘Oh, I don’t care what people say about me.’ And to a certain extent, I don’t, I reeeally don’t. But as a young person it’s like, come on. And it’s not like guys don’t get it at all, but women are sooooooo harshly judged.”

    Source: theguardian.com – February 1, 2008.

    “I hate how box office failures are blamed on an actress, yet I don’t see a box office failure blamed on men. I think a lot of the time in films, men get roles where they create their own destiny and women are just tools, supporters for that. I guess it’s because we live in a patriarchal society, where feminism is a dirty word.”

    Source: theguardian.com – February 1, 2008.

    “As a girl, you’re supposed to love Sleeping Beauty. I mean, who wants to love Sleeping Beauty when you can be Aladdin?”

    Source: theguardian.com – February 1, 2008.

    “When I was 5, someone thought it was smart to let me watch The People Under the Stairs. It might not have even been that scary, but I do remember skinned people in cages under the stairs and a man who lived in a wall without a tongue… and that’s why I cry after sex.”

    Source: AOL – 2007.

    “I kind of get obsessed with roles. Acting for me is about disappearing – if I’m absorbed, it always feels good.”

    Source: Lush Magazine – Spring – 2008.

    “I didn’t think any role could drain me the way Hard Candy did, but then I did The Tracey Fragments.”

    Source: Lush Magazine – Spring – 2008.

    “I learn so much from these films – about myself and the world; I can go into a film and think one thing, and then come out with a completely different perspective.”

    Source: Lush Magazine – Spring – 2008.

    “This is what I love to do [acting] and if I wasn’t challenging myself or being a part of a films that really made my heart get excited I would be bored and I’d be bad in them. It’s just what I love to do.”

    Source: IndieLondon – 2007.

    “I’ve been really, really lucky because whole, honest roles for young women don’t often exist. But now people are like, ‘Whoa, you’re such a feminist! You play such young, strong women.’ It’s like, if I were a guy, you wouldn’t be saying that to me. If I was a guy you wouldn’t be saying, ‘Wow, you play such strong young male roles.’ The question wouldn’t exist.”

    Source: Buzz Interview – December 17, 2007.

    “Everything that I’ve done has led to something else, which has led to something else. It’s kind of fun when people try to label me a cool, indie girl, and I’m like, ‘No, I’m pretty sure I was in a movie called I Downloaded a Ghost, which is about a girl who downloads a ghost.’ “

    Source: The New ‘Indie Girl’ – BlackBook – November 1, 2007.

    “The only real change is that I’ve realized I have to be a little more cautious about things. I’ve become a little more exposed, vulnerable. To a certain extent, you have to remain private about things. Sometimes it makes me question people more. It’s like, ‘Oh, that’s so funny that these people who never talked to me in high school are now talking to me.’ It’s like, fuck you. Do you really think I’m the kind of person who’s going to fall for that?”

    Source: The New ‘Indie Girl’ – BlackBook – November 1, 2007.

    “Challenge is a big aspect of it [projects], because if it’s not a challenge, then I’m bored. And if I’m bored, then I’m not passionate. And if I’m not passionate, then I get depressed. It definitely is a form of escapism, and I’m addicted to it. That’s actually why I took some time off. I said to myself, ‘I’m fine as myself, as a normal human being.’ These roles have come to me, and the characters tend to branch away from stereotype, and offer me the ability to connect with them.”

    Source: The New ‘Indie Girl’ – BlackBook – November 1, 2007.

    “I mean, of course I’m not fucking racist. A lot of my friends see tons of Ellen-isms in Juno. I don’t really tend to care about what other people think—not in a rude way—but in a, ‘here I am, take it or leave it’ kind of way.”

    Source: The New ‘Indie Girl’ – BlackBook – November 1, 2007.

    “Yes, I am a little like Juno. If you’re asking me if I’m more like Juno than a sadistic human being that likes to cut off mens balls… Yes! I’m much more connected to Juno… I can be really inappropriate, kinda like Sarah Silverman on speed… maybe not as racist.” (About her film Juno)

    Source: 32nd Toronto International Film Festival – September 8, 2007.

    “I like Henry Miller because he had an affair with a nice man who wrote female erotica, you know… the turn of the century, which is really cool… and we have the same birthday, and I like the idea of having the same birthday as someone who wrote female erotica in like, 1912.”

    Source: StarTV – 2006.

    “Here I am 5 foot 2 on a good day and fighting and kicking butt… It’s a good time.”

    Source: StarTV – 2006.

    “It’s really crazy to think that it’s happening already, but it is and it’s really freaky. I was on the streetcar in Toronto and someone came up to me. And then, I was in a Borders in L.A. and someone came up to me. It blows my mind. But, I’m not going to change because of it. I don’t think I’m cool because I’m an actor. If anything, it makes me more self-deprecating.”

    Source: MBmagazine – May 26, 2006.

    “The thing I like about acting is being able to lose yourself completely in someone else.”

    Source: USA Today – April 11, 2006.

    “I’m not that comfortable when I get recognized.”

    Source: USA Today – April 11, 2006.

    “I don’t really want to do the Hollywood thing, I think you ought to try to say something with your movies.”

    Source: USA Today – April 11, 2006.

    “I don’t care if people like my character. I just want them to think about the movie’s message.”

    Source: USA Today – April 11, 2006.

    “When I feel strongly about something, I’m not so quiet.”

    Source: USA Today – April 11, 2006.

    “I’m a total shrimp [5 feet], which makes me look younger. I’ll be able to stay in that area longer, which is good, because there’s more competition in your 20s.”

    Source: nydailynews.com – January 1, 2006.

    “Kitty is intelligent, brave and speaks for herself. She’s a bit more of a smart-ass than I am.” (Kitty Pryde/Shadowcat in X-Men 3)

    Source: nydailynews.com – January 1, 2006.

    “I just love it so much [acting]. When I get passionate, I’ll give you everything until I collapse. That’s not in any ’Look at me, I’m a saint’ kind of way. It’s very selfish in a way. I’m doing this really awesome exploration, and it’s like a drug, because I completely disappear.”

    Source: Now Magazine – November 3-10, 2005.

    “It’s about humans, it’s about loneliness, it’s about love and I think it’s about feeling isolated too because it’s like; us humans, we all have our own problems you know… things we are dealing with and its like everyone in the story is dealing with all these little things and if they would just go to the person that their having the issue with and open their hearts, it most likely would be resolved. It’s wonderful.” (About her film Wilby Wonderful)

    Source: 29th Toronto International Film Festival – September, 2004.

    “Judging people you don’t know for things you don’t understand is just really stupid.”

    Source: Undefined.

    “I know you’re supposed to say you’d like to go back in time and kill someone that did something really awful… but that aside, I guess I’d want to go back to New York in the 1970s to see Patti Smith play ‘Horses‘ live. I’m kind of a dork like that.”

    Source: Undefined.

    Quotes sourced and dated by Ellen Page Daily.

    Last Update: July 15, 2015.

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